Prime The Dirty VersionAuthor Medina Faris – Cheapnikeshoes.co

Asia Salam, A Hip Hop DJ With A Guilty Conscience, Finds Herself Ducking Bullets On The Same Night Her Drug Dealing Brother Deen Fails To Meet Her With Some Serious NewsTem R Mirzaev, A Disenchanted Hitman Struggling With His Jailbird Father S Puzzling Legacy, Might Know A Thing Or Two Re Deen S Whereabouts Too Bad He S Concerned With His Future In The Biz Than The Occasional Casualty Of WarBut When A Chance Meeting Forces Asia And Tem R To Cross Paths, It Soon Sets In Motion A Chain Of Events That Has Them Racing To Uncover The Truth Of What Happened The Night That Deen Disappeared And What They Learn About The People Closest To Them Means Dire Consequences For All Set In The Foreground Of The Economic And Political Upheaval Of , The Dirty Version Is A Story Of Blood Ties That Bind, The Grey Between Good And Evil, And The Im Possible Quest To Save A Life


10 thoughts on “The Dirty Version

  1. says:

    The Dirty Version is my FAVOURITE book ever I ve never found any Muslim representation quite like this before The author explores aspects of Islam that you never get to consider in a fiction novel For example, what it means to be a good person, destiny, life after death, etc And all of this is done through the criminal underground in Toronto I love it I love the author s style of writing It s contemporary and slangy, and offensive but in a good way That s why the title is in the form of an explicit advisory symbol that you see on CDs I like the fact that it s a literary novel with a plot Those are basically extinct now, so I find it valuable I like the fact that I can be challenged intellectually while following a story to its conclusion Too many books coming out now only have one or the other I think the characters are fleshed out very well I almost feel like these are people I know in real life Especially Asia and Deen You get the feeling they could have been people you grew up with if you re a millennial All in all, I think it s an important read whether or not you re Muslim I think it addresses a lot of the struggles Muslims in the west face and gives us hope for what the future could be like.


  2. says:

    Bomb And not in a bad way This book changes everything Everything you think about Toronto, everything you think about Muslims, about crime, about success, about music The voice is sick Asia s story is a good contrast with Temur s, and it s fun switching between the two.The author uses Arabic to show how second generation Muslim kids are always having to switch between directions we call backwards and forwards because Arabic is r to l instead of l to r like English , which really blew my mind, because I never even thought of that before You don t even see a lot of stories about second generation Muslims on the market it s like they don t even exist This book works hard to make us visible.Worth every star you ve got, Goodreads.


  3. says:

    Muslim rep I can actually co sign as in, not stereotypical or too sentimental Set in a city I live in that s a plus Story s very fast paced and full of wordplay that makes you think Characters are real, and I felt like I knew people like them growing up Even with the mystery revealed, I could probably reread this again, which is why I gave it the 5 stars Too many books, you don t want to touch them again after, even if they were good the first time THE DIRTY VERSION just comments so much on so many different things religion, society, relationships, the education system, popular culture, etc that I think it s definitely worthwhile to read and re read over again.


  4. says:

    I picked up a copy of this from Word on the Street in Toronto I was not disappointed There are some rare finds over there I initially bought the book because it was about Muslim people, but I was surprised by the complexity of the writing Faris has uncovered a world that mostly goes unnoticed in the book community The novel is packed with action and excitement I like the way the dual narrative compliments the plot The ending was also pretty satisfying I believe this is one of the most important novels to read for us in our current climate


  5. says:

    This book reminds me of a fictionalized version of The Stickup Kids It had a very Canadian feel to it though This novel has some important insights I liked some of the comments on how as Canadians we tend to obsess over American politics to the point where we don t understand what s going on in our own country Temur is probably the most interesting character in the novel He has a complicated relationship with his father and his career that gets explored in an unconventional way Deen is a pretty unique character as well I find that I know so many people like him in real life but I ve never read about a character written like Deen before He is someone to be sympathetic and unsympathetic for at the same time I think Deen s issues with his mother run parallel to Temur s issues with his father, but they end up resolving them in different ways This is a good book to read if you re looking for some entertainment in a way that makes you think.


  6. says:

    Just wrote a review for A Case of Exploding Mangoes and it made me think of this book the line the author uses from Yunus prayer I think there s a lot to like in this novel about the way that Islam is depicted You have this set of young Muslims who are grappling with their faith throughout the book, but the author incorporates Islam in ways that don t serve an especially political agenda It s hard to read a book by a Muslim author these days that doesn t warp Islam and present it as something palatable to people Muslim and non Muslim that want Muslim reduced to a tag that emphasizes race and culture above all else So it s interesting that the author didn t choose to go that route.I found the storyline engaging and I liked that the characters were well developed and unique I m anxious to see what this author comes up with next.


  7. says:

    Wow Where did this come from A friend lent me this book and I was NOT disappointed I was a little afraid to read it, because she said there IS some violence in it and there IS some violence in it and explicit language , but it s still pretty funny and has some really cute moments and is just so exciting Love, love, love the Muslim representation Asia and Temur have a great connection and I wish there were even scenes with both of them, but I guess you can t have everything I would 100% recommend this book to anyone looking for stories about young Muslim people born and raised in Canada This book leaves the little that s out there about second generation Muslims in the dust


  8. says:

    In the DJ booth at Toxic, all we play are deadbeats.WOW, you got me hooked on that first sentence Faris reminds me of a combination of Chariandy and Beatty She writes in a unique style and comes up with fresh prose She writes about characters that are invisible to the literary world I ve probably never read about second generation Canadians besides Chariandy s Brother, I can t think of another novel that features them The characters are so real The novel is fast paced and the chapters are short, so this book is ideal for people on the go.


  9. says:

    This is really different from what I normally read, and there s a lot I don t understand about the subculture explored in this novel, but I found the story engaging and I thought the author s treatment of Islamic themes was so caring I grew very interested in the characters and invested in their fates At times, it s a tough book to read, but overall, it s definitely a rewarding literary journey I look forward to stories from Medina Faris, and hope they are as equally rooted in North American Muslim experiences.


  10. says:

    I couldn t really put this book down once I picked it up There aren t a lot of books out there for Muslim people and even less that Muslim guys can relate to It was nice to read a challenging novel that makes you consider the purpose of your faith and the people on the fringes of it There are a lot of Muslims debating trivial things right now and I think this book asks some of the big questions.